Call for Papers: Pleasures of Violence

https://www.brookes.ac.uk/about-brookes/events/pleasures-of-violence


*Conference to be held at Oxford Brookes University (Oxford, UK)*
March 7-8,2019

It has become a truism to claim that social media bring out the worst in us. But who gets to be the subjects and the agents of violence in an economy built to repackage violence? In Updating to Remain the Same Habitual New Media, Wendy Chun exposes the hypocritical dissonance between our fantasies about the Internet and our online practices. For instance, we are continually surprised at the leaking of a network that is precisely built to leak; or we project the promiscuousness of networks onto bodies that aren’t supposed to matter. Digitality has become, then, indissociable from questions of injury, aggression and pre-determined targets. Such impulses of violent digitality have further become central spectacles on cinema, television and video game screens. Why does the digital seem so well suited for the most insidious and blatant of death drives?

From misogyny to racism, from trolling to warfare, from disaster porn to revenge porn, to be immersed in popular visual culture is to have to negotiate the circulation, broadcasting and spectacle of violence. Is digital violence the re-enactment of analog modes of violence or a brand new kind of economy? Have digital networks simply brought to the surface the cesspool of destructive desires that whirled beneath surfaces all along, or do they facilitate unprecedented modes of acting out, and suffering from, violence? How might we, scholars and creative practitioners, imagine ways of combating or repairing violence?
This conference aims to consider questions of abuse, misuse of power and aggression in the (post-)digital age from a variety of perspectives and fields, exploring the relationship between violence (physical, psychological, symbolic, et al) and digitality writ large. It also takes seriously the pleasures on offer through such digital violence, whether that is the action cinema’s fight sequence or the trainwreck celebrity. Is “digital violence” a redundant category? How does violence play out in different national contexts and creative industries: cinema, gaming, photography, music, fashion?

We welcome abstracts that centre on, but are not limited to the following:

* Doxing, firehosing, gaslighting: The New Language of Violence
* Representations of violence in contemporary TV, cinema, series and podcasts
* Bot-enacted gender and racial violence
* The relationships between genre and violence
* Digital terrorisms
* The digital circulation of xenophobia
* Disaster porn, revenge porn and other types of sexual violence
* Online communities of violence and self-harm
* Outing as a form of violence
* Youtube as platform for confessing violence
* Social media, feminism and the exposure of rape culture
* The weaponization of gossip, hearsay, fake news and misinformation
* BDSM online communities: The New Erotic Possibilities of Violence
* Biometric technologies of racial violence
* Necro/Bio-political violence
* Neo-colonial violence
* Glamourization and fetishization of violence

Please send abstracts of 250 – 300 words, with a supporting bio of no more than 100 words, toviolenceconferencebrookes@gmail.com

*Abstract deadline: Monday 31st of December 2018.*

Dr Diego Semerene
Senior Lecturer in Film Studies and Digital Media
Oxford Brookes University
@diegosemerene
Dr Diego Semerene
Senior Lecturer in Film Studies and Digital Media
Oxford Brookes University
@diegosemerene
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Call for Abstracts: “Cinema and Social Conflicts,” Volume 6 (2019) DANIEL FAIRFAX, ANDRÉ KEIJI KUNIGAMI, AND LUCA PERETTI, eds.

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Introduction

Cinema has played a pivotal role in recounting, reinventing, and depicting the world we live in. Most major historical events have been represented in cinema, from the world wars to the fall of the Berlin Wall, while several others have been left invisible in the filmic archive. This issue focuses on the relationship between cinema and social conflicts: revolutions, protests, riots. How does cinema not only describe, but also inscribe and produce social struggles—influencing their present and future? We are interested not only in how cinema represents historical events, such as the Russian Revolution, anti-colonial struggles, the Chinese Cultural Revolution, or the 1968 unrests, but we also want to look at cinema as a site of conflict, in different parts of the world: its role in fueling revolutionary consciousness, in mediating spaces of conflicts through performative documentary practices, in strategies of self-representation of organizations, in the disputes over memories of struggles through different archival practices, and in fighting mainstream cinematic representation. We also welcome contributions that address how cinematic practices have expanded into new forms of networked organizing through social media, shaping at once new modes of transnational resistance and of filmmaking.

Aims and Objectives

This volume of Zapruder World aims at bringing different perspectives on how cinema has functioned as a means to narrate and consolidate the memory of social conflicts, and as site of dispute, mediation, and production of struggles. Be it in film theory, grassroots guerrilla filmmaking, or transnational networks of alternative distribution and exhibition, cinema not only represents but also produces, imagines, and enables different modes of political struggle. We call for papers that go beyond the analysis of the issue of historical representation, addressing how cinema has contributed to social struggles in any and all intersections of nation, class, sex, and race. We are equally interested in contributions that look at how the history of social conflicts has contributed to the shaping of cinema.

Topics and Themes

We invite contributions focusing on any area of the world, which address one or more of the following themes:

  • Cinema and revolutions
  • Cinema and/as anti-colonial struggle
  • Cinema, new media, and networked modes of resistance
  • Guerrilla cinema
  • Cinema and activism
  • Political film theory
  • Cinema and territorial conflict
  • Indigenous cinema
  • Film and labor
  • Cinema, sex, gender, race
  • Cinema and incarceration
  • Politics of distribution and exhibition
  • Film history and the politics of archive
  • Cinema and strikes

In addition to scholarly articles, we invite submissions of non-essay form original work, such as photo essays, videos, interviews, drawings, comics, songs, hyperlinks to online resources, multimedia, etc., both accompanying the articles themselves and as standalone contributions. We encourage authors to think about incorporating multimedia both into their pieces proposed for Zapruder World and in the sections we have created on the journal’s website (e.g. “Yesterday” and “Today“).

Volume Deadlines & Schedule

Abstracts in English (200-400 words) shall be sent to submissions@zapruderworld.orgby February 15, 2019. All contributors will be informed about the status of their abstract submission by March 5, 2016. The full article (6,000-9,000 words) will be expected by June 15, 2018.

For information on Zapruder World’s peer review process or submission instructions, please see the following URLs:

Call for Abstracts: Entangled Natures – A Conference on Human Ecology (14 – 17 Feb 2019) at AUD | Deadline: 15 Jan 2019

imageFor some years now, the post-monsoon season brings narratives of environmental doom to conversations occurring in drawing rooms and chai stalls across the city of Delhi. The smog that envelopes the city and makes breathing a difficult activity forces a flurry of activity and finger-pointing. Farmers and fossil fuels, construction and climate change, policy and profligacy, no one is spared. Issues like air pollution demonstrate inescapably that environmental concerns are simultaneously social, technical and political in nature. For policymakers and practitioners, the value of questioning the divide between natural and social sciences, between the ontological realms of nature and culture has become more apparent than ever. Within academic disciplines, these questions have been raised for at least half a century since C.P. Snow’s publication of The Two Cultures. Calls for collaboration across knowledge silos to study multidimensional environmental issues have gained credence steadily in the last thirty years. This can be seen in the emergence of sub-disciplines within traditional disciplines, like environmental history, as well as new areas like conservation biology and science and technology studies.

Human Ecology is an eclectic field of research within this tradition of interdisciplinary knowledge endeavours. Research and teaching at the School of Human Ecology (SHE) brings together philosophical frameworks, methodologies and toolkits from natural and social science disciplines to understand interactions between environment and society. There is a distinctive emphasis on studying issues at smaller spatial scales and focusing on complexity and causality in the intertwined lives of humans and other species. Scholars at SHE are inclined towards the worm’s-eye view while studying ‘big questions’ of justice, well-being and sustainability in local, empirical contexts. Human and nonhuman agencies are explored in ecological and social transformations in South Asia, in the present as well as in the past.

The Entangled Natures conference invites scholars and students who are engaged in research on such issues that are of interest to Human Ecology. The five conference panels reflect thematic areas of research within SHE. They discuss geographies that are marginal to mainstream concerns, such as India’s islands and high-altitude rangelands, and heterodox approaches to studying classic themes, such as cities, agriculture and environmental governance. Contributions are invited from scholars and early career researchers working on these themes, as elaborated in the panel abstracts.

Panel 1: Agriculture in the Anthropocene

Panel 2: Hybridity, Power and Culture in Environmental Governance

Panel 3: Nature and the City

Panel 4: Tracing Continuities and Change in Pastoral Systems

Panel 5: Islands in the Indian Ocean

For details regarding panels and submission guidelines, please visit: https://www.entanglednatures.com/call-for-abstracts

For enquiries, please email: sheconference@aud.ac.in

PhD scholarships: Internet-distributed television and platform governance

Photo of Mark Zuckerberg with mediaInternet-distributed television: Cultural, industrial and policy dynamics

Supervisor: Distinguished Professor Stuart Cunningham (s.cunningham@qut.edu.au)

This project investigates the impact of global subscription video-on-demand platforms on national television markets. As U.S.-based services such as Netflix and Amazon Prime Video open up these markets to unprecedented competition, the project will provide much-needed comparative analysis of how governments are responding and what the implications are for debates about local content, local screen production, and media diversity. Analysis of original production and programming strategies will identify new forms of transnational media flow. Conceptually, the project aims to advance our understanding of an emerging paradigm of globalising, multiterritory television.

The PhD project sits within a wider Australian Research Council-funded project (conducted by Ramon Lobato (RMIT University), Amanda Lotz and Stuart Cunningham (QUT)). You are invited to propose an area of focus, for example, on a particular streaming service, institution, national context, production practice, policy issue.

The Platform Governance Project: Rethinking Internet regulation as media policy

Supervisor: Professor Terry Flew (t.flew@qut.edu.au)

The Platform Governance Project is an Australian Research Council (ARC) funded project that investigates the regulatory and policy implications of understanding global digital platforms as media companies. Responding to ongoing public concern about these companies’ self-management of online communication and social media, this project will address these concerns by developing detailed recommendation for reform based on international case studies, enabling media policy makers to more effectively regulate digital media platforms to better align with contemporary public interest rationales. As part of a research a team led by Professor Terry Flew (QUT), and working with Nicolas Suzor (QUT), Fiona Martin (Sydney) and Tim Dwyer (Sydney), the PhD candidate will conduct research on the changing political economy of digital platforms, the value ecology of content distributed online through these platforms, and the shifting relationship of media and communications policy to such challenges. It would be advantageous to have a research background in media and creative industries, and an interest in media law and policy.

Applications must contain the following:

  1. A two page research proposal demonstrating alignment to the selected project including proposed project title, project outline, research question or problem statement, a brief overview of previous relevant research, objectives of the program of research and investigation, research methods/methodologies and plan including references to key literature/contextual sources.
  2. Full Curriculum Vitae including three referees (two referees must be academic).
  3. Academic Transcripts from previous undergraduate and postgraduate study.

Applications close midnight (ADST) Friday 25th January 2019.

Applicants will be notified of outcome by Friday 15th February 2019.

Applications are to be sent as a single pdf to the QUT Digital Media Research Centre Coordinator at dmrc@qut.edu.au

For further information about the projects please contact the listed project supervisor directly via email.

Eligibility 

To apply for this scholarship, you must meet the entry requirements for a Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) at QUT, including any English language requirements for international students.

You must also:

  • have completed a first-class Honours degree, a research Masters degree, or a coursework Masters degree with a significant research component from a recognised institution and in a cognate discipline
  • be able to take up the scholarship and begin full-time study no later than July 2019 and enrol full-time
  • develop a research proposal that responds to and aligns with the aims of either the Internet-distributed television or Platform Governance Project
  • demonstrate excellent capacity and potential for research.

For more follow the link – https://research.qut.edu.au/dmrc/research-training/phd-scholarships-internet-distributed-television-and-platform-governance/?fbclid=IwAR0D06_6gFzx3C82nQPeQbsGxGyDkf6Yg6vX338itlfGq0LRfoUzieOhLkg

Call for Applications: 2019 South Asian Studies Fellowships

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Cornell University’s South Asia Program (SAP) welcomes applications from scholars, writers, curators, and artists based in South Asia (only Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, Maldives, Nepal, Pakistan, or Sri Lanka) to visit Cornell University for a fellowship period of between two and four months to undertake research, artistic productions, and/or collaborations related to South Asian Studies. Fellows will have the opportunity to collaborate with Cornell faculty, post-doctoral fellows, and graduate students, and to involve themselves in South Asia Program activities. SAP has hosted two cohorts of fellows, in 2017 and 2018.

The South Asia Program will award two fellowships for residence at Cornell University between August and December 2019. Each Fellow will receive $6,000 and the necessary documents for J-1 visa application purposes. SAP cannot guarantee success in obtaining a visa, as this is issued by the US government. All travel, housing, health insurance, and visa fees are the responsibility of the Fellow. SAP can assist with securing housing on campus, subject to availability.

Cornell University’s South Asia Program is an interdisciplinary hub for Cornell students, faculty, staff, community members, and academic visitors. It has over 40 affiliated faculty from across Cornell’s colleges and professional schools, ranging from the humanities, social sciences, and natural sciences to law, business, and public policy. The U. S. Department of Education has designated SAP as one of eight Title VI National Resource Centers for South Asia.

Requirements

  • Applicants must be resident in South Asia at the time of the fellowship to be eligible.
  • These fellowships cannot to be used for dissertation or master’s degree research.
  • Applicants who have undertaken studies, fellowships or employment in North America in recent years (since 2014) are not eligible.
  • Citizens of South Asian countries living outside of South Asia are not eligible.

Application

Applications must be submitted online by the 14 January 2019 deadline via https://fundingapp.einaudi.cornell.edu. The application link is at the bottom of the menu on the right, under “External Grants.”

Applications will be reviewed by an interdisciplinary faculty committee. Decisions will be made based on the quality of the proposed project, the demonstrated capability of the applicant to complete the project, and the project’s fit with Cornell faculty specializations and other university resources (such as the library, curatorial and performance opportunities, etc.).

Applications must include:

  1. All information in the online form, including highest degree received.
  2. A two-page CV including institutional affiliation, educational qualifications, and key publications/works produced.
  3. A two-page narrative explaining the work to be undertaken during the fellowship period, proposed dates for the fellowship, its relevance to your scholarly/artistic development, and which Cornell faculty and resources you would like to engage with.
  4. Email addresses of two recommenders. They will automatically receive an email with instructions for their letters of reference, which are due by 21 January 2019.

Please direct any questions to sap@einaudi.cornell.edu.

Call for chapters – Routledge Companion to TV News

Calling all researchers of TV news making! Chapters are invited for the
new Routledge Companion to TV News – an edited volume aiming to collate
recent research of the making of TV news.
Deadline for submitting your chapter is Thursday the 10^th of January.
Submissions should be no more than 200-250 words. Submit your chapter
idea to Line Hassall Thomsen at: LHT@cc.au.dk <mailto:LHT@cc.au.dk>.

The book is under contract with Routledge, to be published end of 2019
in the Routledge Companions series –
https://www.routledge.com/Routledge-Companions/book-series/ROUTCOMPS

The book is edited by Line Hassall Thomsen (Aarhus University, Denmark.

At a time where TV news is struggling and changing like never before,
this book will take readers through an impressive range of essays on the
current state and practices of TV news making today. The Routledge
Companion to TV News Making aims to be a seminal reference source for
the rapidly changing field of TV news. This book aims to bring a
multi-facetted perspective to current debates on TV news and news making
today. It is the hope that this companion will bring a new perspective
to the field of TV news studies, mixing the everyday reality of TV news
work with analysis from a varied range of academic disciplines. This
approach will be shaped by new analysis from international writers of
multiple disciplines welcoming theories from both politics, media
studies, communications, sociology and anthropology.

*BOOK THEMES*:
We are very much looking forward to your submission. Possible themes
could suit, but are not limited to these following themes:

*PART I: THE HISTORY OF TV NEWS*

This section will cover both the history of broadcasting, the history of
public service broadcasting. Discussions will include how broadcasters
once enjoyed a monopoly on news, much different to today when news is
available on a plethora of broadcasters, media and platforms.

*PART II: DIFFERENT APPROACHES TO STUDYING THE MAKING OF TV NEWS*

This section will introduce a range of different approaches to studying
TV news making.

*PART III: CENTRAL ISSUES*

This section gives an insight into some of the most central issues in
the study of TV news making today. Concepts of democracy and the public
sphere will be central categories of analysis.**

**

*PART IV: **EMERGING TRENDS*

Among others, this section will introduce some of the main discussions
on multiskilling journalism and the use of social media for broadcast
news today. The section will also devote space to focus on how
journalists perceive current changes and how this influences workflows.

*PART V: TV NEWS-MAKING AROUND THE WORLD *
This section will provide a global perspective to current debate of TV
news making. As may be shown, TV news still plays a crucial part in
nation building, democracy and local governance around the world.

*PART VI: DISCUSSIONS ON THE FUTURE OF TV NEWS *
So, will TV news survive? Is this a time of apocalypse or opportunity
for Broadcast news? No doubt the role of TV news is rapidly changing.
Where will TV news making be in ten years? And what exactly will the
Internet and the increased demand for using social media mean to TV
news? This section will attempt at answering some of these, and many
more questions facing TV journalism makers and TV news researchers today.