CFP: Asian Cinema Studies Society Conference, June 2019

Papers and panel proposals are invited for the 13th Asian Cinema Studies Society Conference: The Environments of Asian Cinemas. With the support of the Faculty of Fine Arts, Media & Creative Industries at LASALLE College of the Arts, in conjunction with the Asian Cinema Studies Society, the conference is planned for 24–26 June 2019, at LASALLE College of the Arts, Singapore.

Participants are invited to present papers on any aspect of Asian cinema, though proposals engaging with the conference theme are encouraged. One key aim here is to seek ways in which Asian cinema studies might engage with the current moment of global environmental crisis. At the same time, however, the conference theme of ‘environments’ is being conceptualized in a broader sense, encompassing not only the material environments of ecocriticism, but also Asian cinema’s represented environments and its various material, cultural and regulatory environments of production, distribution, exhibition and reception.

Possible topics may include, but are by no means limited to, the following areas:

  • Ecocriticism and Asian cinemas
  • Animal studies and/or plant studies approaches to Asian cinemas
  • Environment and representation in Asian film and media
  • Asian cinema and the city
  • Asian cinema and the rural
  • Environmental issues in Asian documentary
  • Apocalyptic themes in Asian film
  • Ecological implications of Asian film production and/or exhibition
  • New technological contexts of Asian film and media
  • Changing regulatory frameworks of Asian film and media
  • Transnational influences on Asian film production/Asian film business
  • Globalization and Asian cinemas
  • Regional dynamics of Asian cinemas
  • Cultural issues in Asian film
  • Censorship issues in Asian film

Language: English

Please send proposals or enquiries to acss2019@lasalle.edu.sg.

For individual paper proposals, send a 200–300 word abstract and be certain to include the title, author name(s), institutional affiliation, mailing address and e-mail contacts, as well as a brief (50–100 word) biography of the contributor. For pre-constituted panel proposals (of three to four papers), be certain to provide a brief description (100 words) of the overall panel along with the individual abstracts and contributor information. Sessions will be 90 minutes in duration, and time limits will be strictly enforced.

The deadline for submission of proposals is 10 December 2018. Notifications of acceptance will be sent out by early February 2019.

There will be no conference registration fee per se, but all participants must be members of the Asian Cinema Studies Society, which requires an annual fee of £38. The fee covers one year membership and one volume of two issues of Asian Cinema, and gives access to the society’s executive meeting at the conference.

Selected papers will be published in the peer-reviewed biannual Asian Cinema. Published by Intellect Books (UK), this seminal journal has long been the flagship publication of the Asian Cinema Studies Society.

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CFP: Conference “Towards Extinction, To Ward Off Extinction” at CECILLE, Lille, France

Towards Extinction, To Ward Off Extinction

An International Conference organised by CECILLE (Centre d’Etudes en Civilisations, Langues et Lettres Étrangères)

 

7-9 November 2019
Université de Lille SHS, France

Convened by: Thomas Dutoit (CECILLE), Sarah Jonckheere (CECILLE/IdA), and Laura Lainväe (EMMA)

Keynote speakers:
Sarah Wood, co-editor and advisory board of OLR and Angelaki, UK

Jesse Oak Taylor, University of Washington, USA

 

Towards Extinction, To Ward Off Extinction

 

More than 99 percent of all species that have inhabited the Earth are estimated to be extinct (Beverly Peterson Stearns and Stephen C. Stearns). Hence, extinction cannot be reduced to futuristic scenarios only: it is at same time present (species are going extinct right now), present in absence (with the traces left behind by past extinctions), and awaiting in the future (extinction of multiple species and their habitats because of the human-caused climate change). Those past, present, and future extinctions construct a complex web of life and death, of coexistence and coextinction.

Extinction is thus an event that is complex, multiple, and haunting, if only because of the ambivalent responses it draws forth. On the one hand, doomsayers express a self-annihilating desire for extinction and consider that humanity is fast-set on a fateful, timely death-course. On the other hand, eco-minded people still hope to find that railroad switch which would allow for a last-minute alteration of mankind’s trajectory. This desire for the quenching out of the human race, along with the concomitant attempts at averting the end, might be symptomatic of the very uncanniness and plurality of extinction itself.

More generally, this attraction/repulsion reaction towards extinction might in fact point to the way one can approach it: to make the unavoidable avoidable, one ought to think about it; in other words, it is necessary to extend one’s thoughts towards extinction in order to ward off extinction. Thought radiates at the core of extinction.

One might argue that it is lack of thinking, and more importantly lack of thinking otherness (i.e.non-human species), coupled with a sinister capitalistic greed, that brought about the Anthropocene: indeed, as early as the Industrial Era, man’s inherently constitutive role in the fashioning of the then-discovered geological record became evident. Extinction was thereby written into our modern concept of time. Even as the concept of anthropogenic agency emerged, mankind’s invention of modern science, and especially evolution, had a gory impact upon animals, violently translating them into species and media through brutal processes of killing, excoriating, eviscerating, etc. (Jesse Oak Taylor).[1]

As humans, we need to be aware of our power to rewrite the earth with pollution, overfarming, deforestation etc.; but we should not forget that we are not only the infamous influencers of the earth, but also the readers of the earth: reading the geological strata, reading fossils, reading animal traces, and reading the consequences of climate change.

One might even aver that the next great extinction is a literary event:it can always only, and by definition, be imagined because if it were to happen actually, there would be no humans left to do the imagining.

This conference will attempt to open up new avenues to alter our ways of thinking about the earth and thinking about otherness in a more eco-responsible way: instead of wounding, the emphasis will be put on caring, on caring for the other, and with the other. Underlying this conference is the urgent need to undermine and decentre all anthropocentric views of human exceptionalism in order to reassess such notions as empathy and responsibility: how can one (take) care and be responsible for the earth? How can we implement an environmental ethics in order to stave off extinction? How does extinction force us to be responsible, not only for present-day non-human species but also to take responsibility and respond for dead species? How can literature make us more responsible readers and writers of the earth?

 

We welcome 20-minute papers that could include but are not limited to the following topics across a wide range disciplinary areas:

 

  • thinking extinction, extinction as possibility of impossibility, or impossibility of possibility
  • ambivalence of extinction
  • records and traces of extinction
  • sensationality of extinction
  • extinction and cinema
  • climate change and extinction
  • extinction and repetition
  • literature, responsibility, and extinction
  • extinction and responsibility

Proposals of about 300 words together with a short biographical note (50 words) in Word or PDF format should be sent to towards.extinction.lille2019@gmail.com by January 1st, 2018. Files should be named and submitted in the following manner:

Submission.FirstNameLastName.docx (or .doc or .pdf)

 

Example:“Submission.JaneDoe.docx”


[1]As Jesse Oak Taylor explains, “[i]n order for species to take shape, animals first had to become specimens. The “type” had to be abstracted from the individual life as that life was converted physically and violently into a sign (“Tennyson’s Elegy for the Anthropocene: Genre, Form, and Species Being).

Interdisciplinary conference “Critical Zone” — Hamburg, Germany in February 2019.

Start Date:
Thursday, July 26, 2018 – 07:45 to Thursday, October 18, 2018 – 07:45

An international interdisciplinary conference “CRITICAL ZONE” which will take place in Hamburg, Germany on 21-22 February 2019.  Inspired by the works of Bruno Latour the conference seeks to explore the image-theoretical implications of the critical zone concept, asking i.e. what the living conditions for images in the critical zone are, whether images can be understood as mediators between earth and humans or as agents within the critical zone or how images contribute to the transformation of knowledge on climate change. Please see the call for papers below and the conference website for details: www.bildkontexte.de.


Call for Papers

Whilst, led by obvious geo- and biopolitical interests, a fierce fight over the existence and dimension of human-made climate change is taking place in the political arena, the Earth is acting unimpressed. Nevertheless, events like droughts, floodings, famines, melting glaciers and the extinction of species are striking us so directly that it seems impossible to clutch at the distancing dichotomy of nature and culture. Based on the measurable and visible extent of human impact on earth geosciences already invented a new geological era: the Anthropocene. However, its epistemes – like those of other sciences and humanities – seem disposable.

Instead of pursuing dichotomous world views or despairingly taking the escape route of climate change denial into an imagined parallel world, Bruno Latour (2017, 2018) proposes to set out for the ‘critical zone’. The ‘critical zone’ is the thin near-surface layer of earth between the bottom of the groundwater and the tops of the trees. There, rock, soil, water, air, and living organisms constantly interact and constitute through highly complex transformational processes the conditions for all terrestrial life. In this zone, Earth displays its agency relevant to humans. Now it is essential to explore this new territory to understand the inseparable interweaving of humans and terrestrial processes.

Such an exploration raises questions of visibility and display. Therefore, the conference undertakes an image-theoretical expedition into the critical zone to collect evidence to answer the following questions:

  • What are the living conditions for images in the critical zone?
  • Can images be understood as mediators between earth and humans or as agents within the critical zone?
  • Which image strategies arise to stage the new political actant ‘earth’?
  • Do there exist other animalia symbolica (Cassirer) next to humans in the critical zone?
  • How are conditions of visibility in the critical zone configured for its figurative symptoms?
  • How do images form/educate within the critical zone? Ho do they (de-)construct world views?
  • How are images involved in the transformation of knowledge on climate change?
  • How does artistic practice articulate these questions, i.e. as critical pointing gestures and transforming creators?

Please send your proposals for papers (30 minutes) and a short academic CV to Jacobus Bracker and Stefanie Johns until 31 October 2018post@bildkontexte.de. The success of this expedition is crucially dependant on its interdisciplinary composition. There is no limitation to specific periods, cultures or assemblages as – like with the preceding four conferences (http://bildkontexte.de) – historical, cultural, and social contrasts are understood as essential epistemic instruments.

Place and time: Warburg-Haus at the University of Hamburg, 21/22 February 2019.

Organisation: Jacobus Bracker (Institute for Archaeology and Cultural History of the Ancient Mediterranean, Faculty of Humanities, University of Hamburg), Stefanie Johns (Art and Visual Education, Faculty of Educational Sciences,
University of Hamburg).

See full CFP.