Call for Papers: Documenting the Archive

 

15th Annual Graduate Student Conference

Department of Cinema and Media Studies, University of Chicago

April 26th and 27th, 2019

Keynote Speaker: Paula Amad, Associate Professor and Department Chair, The Department of Cinematic Arts, The University of Iowa

Documentary film practice inflects and is in turn also inflected by the theories and practices around the study of the archive. Documenting the Archive aims to be a forum for theoretical and methodological interventions in cinema and media studies by invoking the archive’s historical and theoretical relationship with cinema, especially documentary film practice. The latin root of the word document, “docere”—which means to show, to teach, or to cause to know—connotes the fraught yet deeply intertwined historical relation between the word ‘document’ and the terms ‘documentary’ and ‘archive’. The practices of documentary filmmaking and of archival production, distribution, and preservation both share the challenged notion of the document as a repository of knowledge. Archives don’t just happen to be there; they are social, historical, political, and cultural constructions that in turn construct social relations themselves. Documentary cinema participates in a similar dialectic: on the one hand, it engages with the world presented in front of the camera—the profilmic. Yet, on the other, it is inextricable from the concerns posited by the archive: evidence, testimony, and historiography. Film scholars and practitioners have animated the archive by imagining new configurations of it, speculating about its lost fragments and absences and exploring the limits and possibilities of cinema’s medium to counter and resist an idea of archive as a static and classificatory storehouse of the past. Recent theoretical works (Amad 2010, Baron 2013, Russell 2018) specifically engage with archives in relation to film and documentary forms. As new modes of apprehending and preserving the everyday are redefining and reconfiguring documentary film practice, the transitions to digital paradigms have led to an epistemological destabilization as well as a reconsideration of the concept of the archive itself. In the wake of technological transformations, what are the political, ethical and aesthetic implications involved in the institutional preservation, artistic strategies, collective praxis and modes of exhibition practices in relation to the archives? The conference pushes the boundaries of cinema and media studies to ask what domains of critical inquiry, forms of experience, and historiographic methodologies emerge by examining the multifarious relations between documentary and archives.

Possible paper topics might include, but are not limited to:

  • Appropriation Art/Films/Videos
  • Found-footage, Found-Sound, Found-text Practices
  • Film Fragments-Archival Fragments
  • Orphan Cinema
  • Essay Films and ‘images of the past’
  • Home Movies and Personal Archives
  • Feminist and Queer Archival Studies
  • Memory, Trauma and Colonial Archives
  • Speculative methodologies /  Afro-Futurism
  • Government archives and films / Propaganda forms
  • Contemporary Art and the Archive / Artists as Archivists
  • Politics and Ethics of Exhibition and Curatorial Practices
  • Representation and Contemporary Visual Culture / Embodied Practices of Archival Recuperation (e.g., Beyonce’s ‘Lemonade’, Childish Gambino’s ‘This is America’)
  • Forensic Archiving and Media Practice
  • New media and archives of the everyday
  • Digital Historiography

We welcome papers from academicians, documentary/film/media practitioners and archival practitioners across disciplines interested in interrogating issues related to documentary film and archival practices and the ones raised above. We highly encourage creative, experimental and alternative modes of presentation that can embody the spirit of the conference CFP in audio-visual/ performative forms.

Please email an abstract (250-300 words) along with a short bio to the organising committee co-chairs Sean Batton, Ritika Kaushik, and Cinta Pelejà at: documentingthearchive@gmail.com by February 10, 2019. Participants will be notified by the end of February.

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Call for Abstracts: “Cinema and Social Conflicts,” Volume 6 (2019) DANIEL FAIRFAX, ANDRÉ KEIJI KUNIGAMI, AND LUCA PERETTI, eds.

global-cinema-1-300x226

Introduction

Cinema has played a pivotal role in recounting, reinventing, and depicting the world we live in. Most major historical events have been represented in cinema, from the world wars to the fall of the Berlin Wall, while several others have been left invisible in the filmic archive. This issue focuses on the relationship between cinema and social conflicts: revolutions, protests, riots. How does cinema not only describe, but also inscribe and produce social struggles—influencing their present and future? We are interested not only in how cinema represents historical events, such as the Russian Revolution, anti-colonial struggles, the Chinese Cultural Revolution, or the 1968 unrests, but we also want to look at cinema as a site of conflict, in different parts of the world: its role in fueling revolutionary consciousness, in mediating spaces of conflicts through performative documentary practices, in strategies of self-representation of organizations, in the disputes over memories of struggles through different archival practices, and in fighting mainstream cinematic representation. We also welcome contributions that address how cinematic practices have expanded into new forms of networked organizing through social media, shaping at once new modes of transnational resistance and of filmmaking.

Aims and Objectives

This volume of Zapruder World aims at bringing different perspectives on how cinema has functioned as a means to narrate and consolidate the memory of social conflicts, and as site of dispute, mediation, and production of struggles. Be it in film theory, grassroots guerrilla filmmaking, or transnational networks of alternative distribution and exhibition, cinema not only represents but also produces, imagines, and enables different modes of political struggle. We call for papers that go beyond the analysis of the issue of historical representation, addressing how cinema has contributed to social struggles in any and all intersections of nation, class, sex, and race. We are equally interested in contributions that look at how the history of social conflicts has contributed to the shaping of cinema.

Topics and Themes

We invite contributions focusing on any area of the world, which address one or more of the following themes:

  • Cinema and revolutions
  • Cinema and/as anti-colonial struggle
  • Cinema, new media, and networked modes of resistance
  • Guerrilla cinema
  • Cinema and activism
  • Political film theory
  • Cinema and territorial conflict
  • Indigenous cinema
  • Film and labor
  • Cinema, sex, gender, race
  • Cinema and incarceration
  • Politics of distribution and exhibition
  • Film history and the politics of archive
  • Cinema and strikes

In addition to scholarly articles, we invite submissions of non-essay form original work, such as photo essays, videos, interviews, drawings, comics, songs, hyperlinks to online resources, multimedia, etc., both accompanying the articles themselves and as standalone contributions. We encourage authors to think about incorporating multimedia both into their pieces proposed for Zapruder World and in the sections we have created on the journal’s website (e.g. “Yesterday” and “Today“).

Volume Deadlines & Schedule

Abstracts in English (200-400 words) shall be sent to submissions@zapruderworld.orgby February 15, 2019. All contributors will be informed about the status of their abstract submission by March 5, 2016. The full article (6,000-9,000 words) will be expected by June 15, 2018.

For information on Zapruder World’s peer review process or submission instructions, please see the following URLs:

Call for Papers: Film-Philosophy Conference, 2019

It’s my great please to announce the CFP for the 2019 Film-Philosophy
conference to be held at the University of Brighton July 9-11.

We invites proposals for presentations on any subject related to film
and philosophy. There is no single overall theme.

Keynote Speakers:

·Dr Victor Fan
<https://www.kcl.ac.uk/artshums/depts/filmstudies/people/acad/fan/index.aspx>,
King’s College London

·Professor Janet Harbord
<https://www.qmul.ac.uk/sllf/film-studies/people/academic/profiles/harbord.html>,
Queen Mary University London

·Dr Andrew Klevan
<https://www.english.ox.ac.uk/people/dr-andrew-klevan>, University of Oxford

·Associate Professor Jane Stadler
<https://communication-arts.uq.edu.au/profile/366/jane-stadler>,
University of Queensland Australia

We invite individual 300-word abstract proposals to be submitted by *31
January 2019*.

http://www.film-philosophy.com/conference/index.php/conf/FP2019/author/submit

We use a track system that provides a number of broad headings to which
a presenter may wish to attach their submission. There is, of course, an
Open track if you feel that your paper does not fit within any of the
other tracks.

The tracks for 2019 are:

·Open

·Aesthetics

·Documentary

·Emotion and Affect

·Environment and the Screen

·Ethics

·Existentialism

·Feminism

·Film cultures online (blogging, social media, podcasting)

·Film-Philosophy and Education

·Intersectionality

·New Technologies in/of Cinema

·Phenomenology

·Philosophy of Fiction

·Politics and Film-Philosophy

·Realism

·The Film-Philosophy Canon

·Video Essays

·Workshops

We only accept *individual *proposals for presentations of 20 minutes.

*We do not accept group panel proposals *except for Workshops.

The track system allows for papers to group organically around common
themes and approaches.

We are open to workshops that have alternative and innovative formats
that provoke discussion and debate. If you have any ideas for a workshop
– in format or content – please contact the conference director
(D.Llinares@brighton.ac.uk <mailto:D.Llinares@brighton.ac.uk>) before
submitting an official abstract via the website.

We are also planning this year to audio record the keynote speakers and
various panel speakers for an audio journal to be produced after the
conference. If you do not want your paper to be recorded in this way,
please indicate on you abstract submission by putting “DO NOT RECORD” at
the end.

http://www.film-philosophy.com/conference/index.php/conf/FP2019

All abstracts will be considered by at least two members of the
conference committee and decisions will be announced in March 2019.

Accommodation information is available on the conference website.

Please contact the conference director Dr Dario Llinares, University of
Brighton: D.Llinares@brighton.ac.uk <mailto:D.Llinares@brighton.ac.uk>
with any questions.

CFP SAS 2019 – 31st Edition of the Society for Animation Studies Conference – Amination is a Place

We are proud to announce that Lusofona University in Lisbon will host the 31st Edition of the Society for Animation Studies Conference.

SAS holds an annual conference at a different international location each year. The upcoming Annual Conference will be held June 17-21, 2019 in Lisbon, Portugal.

For over a century, the art of the moving image has captured and reconstructed our surroundings, simultaneously reassuring and questioning our perception(s) of the real.

Under the theme ANIMATION IS A PLACE , the 31st SAS conference aims to celebrate animation as one of the most vital contemporary forms of visual expression.

We invite practitioners and scholars to address animation as a privileged space within the realm of the moving image, a unique position that allows animators to not only create imaginary worlds but also, importantly, to look at and challenge the world we live in.

Although we welcome submissions on any topic within the field of Animation Studies, this year we particularly welcome a focus on animation practice and theory as a reflection of its time and place, as a tool of cultural expression, and invite proposals to respond to a wide range of topics:

The Impact Of Geography And/Or Cultural Identity On Animation Production

Independent Animation: Case Studies

Globalisation and The Rise Of International Co-Productions: A Platform To Sustain Small Industries Or A Homogenizing Agent Of Aesthetics And Content?

Teaching And Learning: An Education In Animation And Animation In Education

Spatial Constructions: Animation, Architecture, And Place

Expanded Animation, Beyond The Screen: Public Space, Installation,
Exhibition…

Practice-Based Animation Research

Documentary Animation

Animation As Therapy

Animation And Gender, Gendered Geographies

Sonic Landscapes – Sound And Composition In Animation

Cross-Disciplinary And Interdisciplinary Approaches To Animation,
Including Sociological And Anthropological Perspectives

We also inform that the call for papers is already open. All interested
individuals should submit the abstract to:
https://congressos.leading.pt/geral/inserirresumo.aspx?evento=56&formulario=128&lingua=en-GB,
*the deadline is December 21st 2018. *

Proposals will be blind reviewed by a panel of SAS members, and
acceptance will be announced by the end of January, 2019. Please be
aware that spaces for presentations are limited. Late proposals will not
be considered until all other proposals have been read. Late proposals
and non-members of SAS at the time of submission will be given lower
consideration.

You will need to be a fully paid member of the SAS to present at the
conference, but you can submit a proposal for consideration even if you
are not currently a member.

Membership/renewal in the Society for Animation Studies for 2019 is
mandatory for all conference presenters.
For more information on the Society, go to www.animationstudies.org

Visit main webpage

Call for (re)presentations: FILMIC FORMS AND PRACTICES OF AUTOCHTHONOUS STRUGGLES. Paris, February 27-28, April 8-9, May 2-3, 2019, La Fémis / PSL Research University

Call for (re)presentations

These three colloquia set out to bring together filmmakers, activists, and researchers to discuss the use of film and media technologies in the social movements of autochthonous populations. In the company of those involved in these communities and social movements, our aim is to map the film and media forms and practices employed within recent and ongoing autochthonous struggles. These exchanges will investigate the different situations and experiences that produce these filmic forms, their vernacular histories and roles within these political and social movements of resistance. The colloquia are organized under the auspices of the research project “For a Global Study of Filmic Practices within Autochthonous Struggles,” lead by Nicole Brenez at the French national film school La Fémis and funded by PSL Research University’s Global Studies initiative.

 

We are looking for proposals for both presentations that fit the more traditional academic format of a 20-minute talk, but also experimental forms. The latter can entail media works or performance pieces, presented and/or performed either in person or submitted to the organizers to be screened/played (video, sound recording) or as notes and directions to be interpreted by the bodies and voices of those present at the events. The proposals for presentations and experimental forms should follow the themes of one of the following events.

 

#1: Autochthonous Cinema against Occupations [North America]

February 27-28, 2019, with

– Alanis Obomsawin (filmmaker and musician)

– Myron Dewey (filmmaker and activist, Digital Smoke Signals)

– Sky Hopinka (filmmaker and visual artist)

 

#2: A Long View on Colonizing Practices and their Amnesia [Pacific/West Indies]

April 8-9, 2019, with:

– John Gianvito (filmmaker and professor at Emerson College)

– Myrla Baldonado (activist, Pilipino Workers Center)

 

#3: Autochthonous Futures, Our Future [Oceania/North America]

May 2-3, 2019, with:

– Karrabing Film Collective (artist and activist collective)

– Lisa Rave (filmmaker and visual artist)

– Erik Blinderman (filmmaker and visual artist)

 

 

The research project and its central concerns

 

Collectively, we aim to create a space for the study and promotion of the role and forms of filmic and media practices, enlisted during times of adversity when the effects of global processes intersect with the lives of indigenous and rural communities.

These autochthonous communities – their identity and ways of life embedded in deep historical and cultural bonds to their lands – are often the first in line to bear witness, suffer and endure political disenfranchisement, state violence, economic exploitation, pollution and contamination of lands and living beings, environmental injustice, expropriation, and displacement. Behind these experiences and instances of plight are large-scale ecological, macroeconomic, and geopolitical processes, which take decades or centuries to play out, encompass continents, and whose origins are largely human. An environmental catastrophe, a negative economic development, or a series of hostile political decisions can lead to situations of intense distress and struggle where autochthonous communities need to mobilize in order to ensure their existence and protect their environment. During these times of conflict, they require tools to frame and render tangible the impacts of global processes. In creating and employing compelling figurative and representational forms, the communities can make their voices heard and raise awareness about their causes, allowing them to reach society at large, which bears a great share of responsibility in begetting and sustaining large-scale processes. Since the 1960s, many of these communities have made use of various media practices as a way to document and engage with the struggles they are involved in.

We are interested in studying how the act of image and sound making becomes a part of the dynamic of the struggle; what effect do the filmic and media practices have on the course of the struggle; how are the figurative and representational forms conceived and adapted to the particular situation; in what ways does the community participate in or influence the process of devising these forms; how are the works lent a historical depth, given a sense of the larger processes at work, while also conveying the urgency of the situation; how and where are the resulting works distributed and what is their effect both within the community and outside?

 

 

Colloquia

 

Colloquium #1 – Autochthonous Cinema against Occupations [North America]

This first meeting will examine the filmic tactics developed by the autochthonous resistance movements in response to land spoliations and the extraction and transportation projects of the mining and petroleum industry. In their masterclasses, filmmaker Alanis Obomsawin of the Abenaki nation, activist and videographer Myron Dewey of the Newe-Numah and Paiute-Shoshone nations, and filmmaker Sky Hopinka of the Ho-Chunk and Pechanga nations, will reflect on the confrontations between autochthonous communities and armed forces in Oka, in 1990, and at Standing Rock, between 2015 and 2017. Both the Oka Crisis and the Dakota Access Pipeline protests at once lay bare the willingness of the government to forcefully deprive the autochthonous communities of their rights and demonstrate how employing filmic practices and media tactics allows the communities to represent themselves and their plight. The proposals for this section could focus on filmic practices developed during these ongoing struggles or on the diversity of filmic forms related to intertribal and pan-Amerindian political movements in North America.

 

Colloquium #2 – A Long View on Colonizing Practices and their Amnesia [Pacific/West Indies]

These two days will be dedicated to the constitution of a first cartography and chronology of filmic practices that document the ongoing autochthonous struggles in the regions historically marked by the colonial influence and practices of the United States. Collective amnesia regarding the colonial history of the Philippines will be the starting point of this colloquium. Filmmaker and professor of visual and media arts at Emerson College, John Gianvito will discuss the films where he explores the political and visual history of American imperialism. Activist Myrla Baldonado, one of the founders of the NGO People’s Task Force for Bases Clean-Up (PTFBC) in the Philippines, will present the history of collective local and international mobilizations against the U.S. military bases Clark and Subic. The conversation will then be extended to all contemporary autochthonous struggles in the Pacific and the West Indies: Okinawa, Micronesia, Philippines, Hawaii, Puerto Rico. We are inviting proposals that will take an empirical or historical (from 1980 to today) perspective on those issues. Special attention will be given to proposals dealing with social mobilizations against American bases, on filmic practices of contemporary environmental struggles in the Pacific or Caribbean regions, as well as on insurgent movements in the southern Philippines.

 

Colloquium #3 – Autochthonous Futures, Our Future [Oceania/North America]

During this last meeting, we will reflect on the filmic, collective, and essayistic forms that represent the present-day experiences of autochthonous communities in contexts marked by the contamination of ancestral lands and the displacement of populations, and that also explore and employ alternative narratives, forms of history, and ideas of coexistence. Karrabing Film Collective will present its work borne of its community in Northern Australia, and filmmakers Lisa Rave and Erik Blinderman will talk about their investigation on Yucca Mountain, a Western Shoshone territory in Nevada, which has been the subject of a continuous colonization process since the Ruby Valley Treaty in 1863. As part of this discussion – extended to the autochthonous peoples of Oceania and North America – the proposals could consider filmic forms that document the intensive exploitation of natural resources and the threats it poses to both autochthonous and all of our futures. Presentations exploring filmic forms that incorporate the ideas of uchronia, utopia, and futurism will be appreciated.

 

 

Two forms of presentation

 

Our wish is to include in our discussions all possible voices. Therefore, this call is open to both academics and non-academics alike, to those who either study the issues related to this research project or those who are involved in and touched by the experiences of struggle. We thus welcome contributions that follow a traditional 20-minute academic presentation but also proposals for experimental forms where the author(s) have a wide range of means to convey ideas and experiences.

 

Academic presentations

Besides exploring the issues articulated above, or discussing the work of one of the invited filmmakers or collectives, the academic presentations may address one or several of the following themes:

– Histories of filmic practices. A study of the practices and/or legacies (archival or other) of an individual filmmaker or an activist collective.

– Empirical and ethnographic study of filmmaking, exhibition, and reception practices.

– Issues and forms of ‘visual sovereignty’ (Michelle Raheja). Ethics of shooting, decision making processes relative to what and when can or cannot be represented (e.g. ceremonial rituals, behind-the-scenes deliberations).

– Technical autonomy and technological sovereignty. Filmmaking and media production in situations marked by digital divide and in the conditions of surveillance and tracking across content and social media platforms.

– Financing and distribution of films. Government funding, aboriginal media and television stations, self-financing, and the impact of these forms of production on filmmaking and the autonomy of the filmmakers.

– Appropriation and adaptation of film and media technologies. Studies on past and “new ways to indigenizing film and technology through Indigenous Eyes” (Myron Dewey).

– The historicity of images and their ability to capture the evolving conditions of autochthonous struggles. The capacity of films at once to document the urgency (occurrences of state violence) and to construct in the long run the vernacular memories of autochthonous struggles.

– Sonic ecology of struggles. Oral histories, chants and protest songs in films.

– Uchronia, utopia, futurism. The futures and alternative realities – imagined, forgotten, or reinvented by the filmic practices of autochthonous struggles.

 

Experimental forms 

We invite proposals for experimental forms that can be constituted of media works (e.g. moving image, sound), involve a performance (e.g. monologue, dialogue, reenactment, dramatization). To encourage and facilitate the participation of those who are unable to travel to Paris, we also welcome proposals for performative forms that could be staged and directed from a distance following notes submitted by the author(s). For the latter, the author(s) would have at their disposal the bodies and voices of the organizers and participants of the colloquia and the entire space where the event takes place (depending on the day, a movie theater, a conference room).

The piece can last up to 20 minutes. The authors can use the language of their choice while the non-English works should be accompanied by an English translation. Thematically, the authors have complete freedom in their proposals as long as they touch upon the central concerns of this research project and follow the regional boundaries of one the three colloquia. For works to be directed from a distance, the organizers commit to discuss the directions/staging beforehand and, if necessary, organize a rehearsal. The performative forms could be filmed/recorded by the organizers following the authors’ instructions and within the technical means at our disposal. The unedited rushes will then be sent to the authors who can freely archive, edit, or distribute these materials.

The proposals for experimental forms should specify:

– the form of the piece (sound recording, video, dialogue…);

– the technical and/or human means necessary for the production of the piece (number of participants, props, technical requirements for the presentation of sound and moving images…);

– a 300-word summary of the performance/stage piece;

– if applicable, indications as to the recording and possible uses of the materials.

The authors should be aware of the aforementioned constraints, the specificity of the resources at their disposal, adapt their works to them accordingly, and keep in mind the importance of notations and instructions to be included with their final work if it is to be directed from a distance.

In order to ensure that the work be presented in the best possible conditions the final work should be received by the organizers at the latest three weeks before the event.

 

 

Calendar and Practical Questions

Please submit your proposal before December 1, 2018, to: alopai@hotmail.com and larcherj@hotmail.fr. The proposals should specify the chosen colloquium, the presentation’s format (performance / video / academic presentation, etc.), include a summary of the academic presentation (500 words) or the experimental form (300 words), a short biographical note, and, if applicable, the human and/or technical means necessary for the production/presentation of the work. The participants will be notified of acceptance by December 17, 2018, and the final program will be published on January 20, 2019. We are unfortunately unable to provide financial aid, the participants will assume transportation and accommodation expenses. For any questions regarding the presentations please write to the email addresses above.

 

 

Organizing committee 

– Nicole Brenez (La Fémis / Sorbonne Nouvelle)
– Daniel Cefaï (EHESS)
– Giovanni Careri (EHESS)
– Jonathan Larcher (EHESS)
– Sébastien Lechevalier (EHESS)
– Ricardo Matos Cabo (Independent film programmer)
– Alo Paistik (EHESS)
– Perrine Poupin (EHESS)
– Caroline San Martin (La Fémis)
– Skaya Siku (Academia Senica)
– Marko Tocilovac (EHESS)
– Barbara Turquier (La Fémis)
– Eric Wittersheim (EHESS)

Fully AHRC funded PhD positions at School of Media, Univ. of Brighton

The School of Media at the University of Brighton is seeking applicants
for Techne Doctoral awards fully funded by the AHRC
Supervision for PhD research, is offered in the following areas:

·       Digital Media
·       Data Culture
·       Environmental Communication
·       Game Studies
·       Community Media
·       Screen Cultures
·       Digital Transformations
·       Media Practice
·       Photography
·       Film Studies
·       Sound Studies and Music
·       Gender and Sexuality
·       Digital Humanities
·       Cultural Informatics
·       Creative Industries
·       Mobility and Transport
·       Activism
·       Popular Culture
·       Immersive Media/AR/VR
·       Creative Media
·       Innovation

We are also interested in Candidates for PhDs by Practice.

For more about the School of Media, please see:
https://www.brighton.ac.uk/about-us/contact-us/academic-departments/school-of-media.aspx
and
https://www.brighton.ac.uk/research-and-enterprise/postgraduate-research-degrees/programme-areas/media-and-communication.aspx

For more about the technē  2019 scheme, please see
https://www.brighton.ac.uk/research-and-enterprise/postgraduate-research-degrees/funding-opportunities-and-studentships/dtp-ahrc-techne.aspx

For further information please contact Janet Anderson  at
J.Delve@Brighton.ac.uk

CfP for chapters on disability, bodies, media and representation in Asia

We have space for some additional chapters in the edited collection
/Disability and the Media: Other Bodies/ on the themes of disability,
bodies, media and representation in Asia**. in the following edited
collection.

Book edited by Diana Garrisi (JC School of Film and Television Arts,
Xi’an Jiaotong Liverpool University) and Jacob Johanssen (Communication
and Media Research Institute, University of Westminster)

Under contract with Routledge and to be published 2019 in the Routledge
Research in Disability and Media Studies series
(https://www.routledge.com/Routledge-Research-in-Disability-and-Media-Studies/book-series/RRDMS
<https://www.routledge.com/Routledge-Research-in-Disability-and-Media-Studies/book-series/RRDMS>)

Using a variety of theoretical and methodological approaches this
volume  encompasses an array of media forms including cinema,
newspapers,  television, advertising and social media. This book has
several purposes. It critically discusses the relationship between
self-representation and representations in either reinforcing or
debunking myths around disability and othering. It explores the
cultural, political and commercial basis for why media can negatively
portray some people as intrinsically different. Finally, it suggests
that the dynamic relationship between traditional and new media and the
blurred lines between forms of representation and self-representation in
new media can make it more difficult to continue framing ability and
disability as mutually exclusive categories, and therefore cast the
latter as unwanted. The book presents instances of a possible, slow
cultural shift in favour of non-dichotomic views on ability and
disability increasingly represented as fluid and necessary conditions
characterizing the essence of each human being.

We are specifically interested in chapters that focus on Asia and its
different countries in relation to the themes of the book.**

Possible themes include but are not limited to:
·         Affective labour of bodies
·         Auto-ethnographic accounts of the body in / through digital media
·         Celebrity bodies and the spectacles of transformation
·         Cinema and disability
·         Contemporary coverage of disability in
print/online/television/radio
·         De-colonizing and de-westernising the mediated body
·         Disability and advertising
·         Disability and race
·         Disability and the media: historical perspectives
·         (Dis)Empowerments of the disabled body
·         Journalism and practices of othering the body
·         Neoliberalism, policy and austerity politics
·         Reality television and the body
·         Representing wounds and scars
·         Researching bodies and the media: frameworks and methodologies
·         Stigma and the body
–         Posthumanist and non-representational frameworks
·         The abject body
·         The body and trauma
·         The mediated body as spectacle
·         The medicalised body in the media
·         The objectification of the disabled body in the media

We invite submissions of 200-250 words chapter proposals. Deadline:
Friday, 21 December 2018

Submissions should also include:
a)            Title of chapter
b)            Author name/s, institutional details
c)            Corresponding author’s email address
d)            Keywords (no more than 5)
e)            A short bio

Please send chapters to diana.garrisi@xjtlu.edu.cn and j.johanssen@westminster.ac.uk

Commissioned chapters are around 5,000 words. The fact that an abstract
is accepted does not guarantee publication of the final manuscript. All
chapters submitted will be judged on the basis of a double-blind
reviewing process.