Call for (re)presentations: FILMIC FORMS AND PRACTICES OF AUTOCHTHONOUS STRUGGLES. Paris, February 27-28, April 8-9, May 2-3, 2019, La Fémis / PSL Research University

Call for (re)presentations

These three colloquia set out to bring together filmmakers, activists, and researchers to discuss the use of film and media technologies in the social movements of autochthonous populations. In the company of those involved in these communities and social movements, our aim is to map the film and media forms and practices employed within recent and ongoing autochthonous struggles. These exchanges will investigate the different situations and experiences that produce these filmic forms, their vernacular histories and roles within these political and social movements of resistance. The colloquia are organized under the auspices of the research project “For a Global Study of Filmic Practices within Autochthonous Struggles,” lead by Nicole Brenez at the French national film school La Fémis and funded by PSL Research University’s Global Studies initiative.

 

We are looking for proposals for both presentations that fit the more traditional academic format of a 20-minute talk, but also experimental forms. The latter can entail media works or performance pieces, presented and/or performed either in person or submitted to the organizers to be screened/played (video, sound recording) or as notes and directions to be interpreted by the bodies and voices of those present at the events. The proposals for presentations and experimental forms should follow the themes of one of the following events.

 

#1: Autochthonous Cinema against Occupations [North America]

February 27-28, 2019, with

– Alanis Obomsawin (filmmaker and musician)

– Myron Dewey (filmmaker and activist, Digital Smoke Signals)

– Sky Hopinka (filmmaker and visual artist)

 

#2: A Long View on Colonizing Practices and their Amnesia [Pacific/West Indies]

April 8-9, 2019, with:

– John Gianvito (filmmaker and professor at Emerson College)

– Myrla Baldonado (activist, Pilipino Workers Center)

 

#3: Autochthonous Futures, Our Future [Oceania/North America]

May 2-3, 2019, with:

– Karrabing Film Collective (artist and activist collective)

– Lisa Rave (filmmaker and visual artist)

– Erik Blinderman (filmmaker and visual artist)

 

 

The research project and its central concerns

 

Collectively, we aim to create a space for the study and promotion of the role and forms of filmic and media practices, enlisted during times of adversity when the effects of global processes intersect with the lives of indigenous and rural communities.

These autochthonous communities – their identity and ways of life embedded in deep historical and cultural bonds to their lands – are often the first in line to bear witness, suffer and endure political disenfranchisement, state violence, economic exploitation, pollution and contamination of lands and living beings, environmental injustice, expropriation, and displacement. Behind these experiences and instances of plight are large-scale ecological, macroeconomic, and geopolitical processes, which take decades or centuries to play out, encompass continents, and whose origins are largely human. An environmental catastrophe, a negative economic development, or a series of hostile political decisions can lead to situations of intense distress and struggle where autochthonous communities need to mobilize in order to ensure their existence and protect their environment. During these times of conflict, they require tools to frame and render tangible the impacts of global processes. In creating and employing compelling figurative and representational forms, the communities can make their voices heard and raise awareness about their causes, allowing them to reach society at large, which bears a great share of responsibility in begetting and sustaining large-scale processes. Since the 1960s, many of these communities have made use of various media practices as a way to document and engage with the struggles they are involved in.

We are interested in studying how the act of image and sound making becomes a part of the dynamic of the struggle; what effect do the filmic and media practices have on the course of the struggle; how are the figurative and representational forms conceived and adapted to the particular situation; in what ways does the community participate in or influence the process of devising these forms; how are the works lent a historical depth, given a sense of the larger processes at work, while also conveying the urgency of the situation; how and where are the resulting works distributed and what is their effect both within the community and outside?

 

 

Colloquia

 

Colloquium #1 – Autochthonous Cinema against Occupations [North America]

This first meeting will examine the filmic tactics developed by the autochthonous resistance movements in response to land spoliations and the extraction and transportation projects of the mining and petroleum industry. In their masterclasses, filmmaker Alanis Obomsawin of the Abenaki nation, activist and videographer Myron Dewey of the Newe-Numah and Paiute-Shoshone nations, and filmmaker Sky Hopinka of the Ho-Chunk and Pechanga nations, will reflect on the confrontations between autochthonous communities and armed forces in Oka, in 1990, and at Standing Rock, between 2015 and 2017. Both the Oka Crisis and the Dakota Access Pipeline protests at once lay bare the willingness of the government to forcefully deprive the autochthonous communities of their rights and demonstrate how employing filmic practices and media tactics allows the communities to represent themselves and their plight. The proposals for this section could focus on filmic practices developed during these ongoing struggles or on the diversity of filmic forms related to intertribal and pan-Amerindian political movements in North America.

 

Colloquium #2 – A Long View on Colonizing Practices and their Amnesia [Pacific/West Indies]

These two days will be dedicated to the constitution of a first cartography and chronology of filmic practices that document the ongoing autochthonous struggles in the regions historically marked by the colonial influence and practices of the United States. Collective amnesia regarding the colonial history of the Philippines will be the starting point of this colloquium. Filmmaker and professor of visual and media arts at Emerson College, John Gianvito will discuss the films where he explores the political and visual history of American imperialism. Activist Myrla Baldonado, one of the founders of the NGO People’s Task Force for Bases Clean-Up (PTFBC) in the Philippines, will present the history of collective local and international mobilizations against the U.S. military bases Clark and Subic. The conversation will then be extended to all contemporary autochthonous struggles in the Pacific and the West Indies: Okinawa, Micronesia, Philippines, Hawaii, Puerto Rico. We are inviting proposals that will take an empirical or historical (from 1980 to today) perspective on those issues. Special attention will be given to proposals dealing with social mobilizations against American bases, on filmic practices of contemporary environmental struggles in the Pacific or Caribbean regions, as well as on insurgent movements in the southern Philippines.

 

Colloquium #3 – Autochthonous Futures, Our Future [Oceania/North America]

During this last meeting, we will reflect on the filmic, collective, and essayistic forms that represent the present-day experiences of autochthonous communities in contexts marked by the contamination of ancestral lands and the displacement of populations, and that also explore and employ alternative narratives, forms of history, and ideas of coexistence. Karrabing Film Collective will present its work borne of its community in Northern Australia, and filmmakers Lisa Rave and Erik Blinderman will talk about their investigation on Yucca Mountain, a Western Shoshone territory in Nevada, which has been the subject of a continuous colonization process since the Ruby Valley Treaty in 1863. As part of this discussion – extended to the autochthonous peoples of Oceania and North America – the proposals could consider filmic forms that document the intensive exploitation of natural resources and the threats it poses to both autochthonous and all of our futures. Presentations exploring filmic forms that incorporate the ideas of uchronia, utopia, and futurism will be appreciated.

 

 

Two forms of presentation

 

Our wish is to include in our discussions all possible voices. Therefore, this call is open to both academics and non-academics alike, to those who either study the issues related to this research project or those who are involved in and touched by the experiences of struggle. We thus welcome contributions that follow a traditional 20-minute academic presentation but also proposals for experimental forms where the author(s) have a wide range of means to convey ideas and experiences.

 

Academic presentations

Besides exploring the issues articulated above, or discussing the work of one of the invited filmmakers or collectives, the academic presentations may address one or several of the following themes:

– Histories of filmic practices. A study of the practices and/or legacies (archival or other) of an individual filmmaker or an activist collective.

– Empirical and ethnographic study of filmmaking, exhibition, and reception practices.

– Issues and forms of ‘visual sovereignty’ (Michelle Raheja). Ethics of shooting, decision making processes relative to what and when can or cannot be represented (e.g. ceremonial rituals, behind-the-scenes deliberations).

– Technical autonomy and technological sovereignty. Filmmaking and media production in situations marked by digital divide and in the conditions of surveillance and tracking across content and social media platforms.

– Financing and distribution of films. Government funding, aboriginal media and television stations, self-financing, and the impact of these forms of production on filmmaking and the autonomy of the filmmakers.

– Appropriation and adaptation of film and media technologies. Studies on past and “new ways to indigenizing film and technology through Indigenous Eyes” (Myron Dewey).

– The historicity of images and their ability to capture the evolving conditions of autochthonous struggles. The capacity of films at once to document the urgency (occurrences of state violence) and to construct in the long run the vernacular memories of autochthonous struggles.

– Sonic ecology of struggles. Oral histories, chants and protest songs in films.

– Uchronia, utopia, futurism. The futures and alternative realities – imagined, forgotten, or reinvented by the filmic practices of autochthonous struggles.

 

Experimental forms 

We invite proposals for experimental forms that can be constituted of media works (e.g. moving image, sound), involve a performance (e.g. monologue, dialogue, reenactment, dramatization). To encourage and facilitate the participation of those who are unable to travel to Paris, we also welcome proposals for performative forms that could be staged and directed from a distance following notes submitted by the author(s). For the latter, the author(s) would have at their disposal the bodies and voices of the organizers and participants of the colloquia and the entire space where the event takes place (depending on the day, a movie theater, a conference room).

The piece can last up to 20 minutes. The authors can use the language of their choice while the non-English works should be accompanied by an English translation. Thematically, the authors have complete freedom in their proposals as long as they touch upon the central concerns of this research project and follow the regional boundaries of one the three colloquia. For works to be directed from a distance, the organizers commit to discuss the directions/staging beforehand and, if necessary, organize a rehearsal. The performative forms could be filmed/recorded by the organizers following the authors’ instructions and within the technical means at our disposal. The unedited rushes will then be sent to the authors who can freely archive, edit, or distribute these materials.

The proposals for experimental forms should specify:

– the form of the piece (sound recording, video, dialogue…);

– the technical and/or human means necessary for the production of the piece (number of participants, props, technical requirements for the presentation of sound and moving images…);

– a 300-word summary of the performance/stage piece;

– if applicable, indications as to the recording and possible uses of the materials.

The authors should be aware of the aforementioned constraints, the specificity of the resources at their disposal, adapt their works to them accordingly, and keep in mind the importance of notations and instructions to be included with their final work if it is to be directed from a distance.

In order to ensure that the work be presented in the best possible conditions the final work should be received by the organizers at the latest three weeks before the event.

 

 

Calendar and Practical Questions

Please submit your proposal before December 1, 2018, to: alopai@hotmail.com and larcherj@hotmail.fr. The proposals should specify the chosen colloquium, the presentation’s format (performance / video / academic presentation, etc.), include a summary of the academic presentation (500 words) or the experimental form (300 words), a short biographical note, and, if applicable, the human and/or technical means necessary for the production/presentation of the work. The participants will be notified of acceptance by December 17, 2018, and the final program will be published on January 20, 2019. We are unfortunately unable to provide financial aid, the participants will assume transportation and accommodation expenses. For any questions regarding the presentations please write to the email addresses above.

 

 

Organizing committee 

– Nicole Brenez (La Fémis / Sorbonne Nouvelle)
– Daniel Cefaï (EHESS)
– Giovanni Careri (EHESS)
– Jonathan Larcher (EHESS)
– Sébastien Lechevalier (EHESS)
– Ricardo Matos Cabo (Independent film programmer)
– Alo Paistik (EHESS)
– Perrine Poupin (EHESS)
– Caroline San Martin (La Fémis)
– Skaya Siku (Academia Senica)
– Marko Tocilovac (EHESS)
– Barbara Turquier (La Fémis)
– Eric Wittersheim (EHESS)
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CFP: Performance Studies In and From South Asia

Type:
Call for Papers
Date:
June 1, 2018
Location:
Wisconsin, United States
Subject Fields:
Colonial and Post-Colonial History / Studies, Dance and History of Dance, Music and Music History, Theatre & Performance History / Studies, South Asian History / Studies

Oct 11, 2018
1:45 pm – 5:30 pm
Madison, WI


CALL FOR PAPERS:

The aim of this symposium is to facilitate a dialogue between the fields of South Asian Studies and Performance Studies, by bringing together scholars and artists who work at the intersection of these two disciplines. In so doing, it addresses two major lacunae: The under-representation of performance as a tool and an object of analysis in the study of South Asia; and the dominant Euro-American-centrism of the discourse of Performance Studies. Performance Studies’ origins as a field can be found in works such as Richard Schechner’s and Victor Turner’s, which combined anthropology and performance in order to examine cultural ritual in India. This symposium will give a new generation of scholars the chance to build on and update the relationship between South Asia and Performance Studies, insisting on a decolonial lens that honors the work emerging from South Asia as critical to investigating what Performance Studies has to offer as a relatively new discipline.

This year, we will focus on how performative analysis might generate new understandings of subjects as diverse as the neoliberal Indian city or the staging of Sanskrit epics. The performance pre-conference in 2017 hosted presentations on a range of topics, including diasporic audiobook performance, meditative practices in Sri Lanka, clubs in colonial Calcutta, and contemporary Tamil Dance championships. We look forward to continuing the discussions that started there, as well as developing the papers we receive this year for an edited volume, the first of its kind to use a Performance Studies methodology, as opposed to a theatre or dance-oriented approach, to explore the rich cultures of South Asia.

We invite submissions of abstracts for 10-minute papers that interrogate why performance matters and that demonstrate what performance can bring to the table in the study of South Asia.

Please email your 250-word abstracts to performancesymposium2018@gmail.com by June 1, 2018.

Contact Info:

Sharvari Sastry (Organiser)
Kat Frances Leider (Organiser)
Arnab Banerji (Organiser)

Berlin Theatertreffen International Forum – open call

The Berlin Theatertreffen International Forum is a two-week programme with an international call for applications. It is aimed at professional theatre makers up to the age of 35 years, whose artistic focus lies in the area of drama.

The Forum sees itself as a platform for comprehensive theoretical and practical exchange. The International Forum 2018 will take place from 4 to 20 of May.

The programme consists of workshops with artists invited to the Theatertreffen, the attendance of performances of Theatertreffen and Stückemarkt as well as the attendance of the further programme of the Theatertreffen. Participants will receive a grant.

Detailed information about the grant programme and applications for the International Forums 2018 can be found here:
International Forum: Open Call 2018 [PDF, 91 KB]
International Forum: Application form 2018Application form 2018 [PDF, 45 KB]

Deadline for applications: 15 December 2017

For more follow the link http://culture360.asef.org/opportunities/berlin-theatertreffen-international-forum-open-call-1

CFP: IFTR Conference 2018 on Theatre and Migration

ABSTRACT SUBMISSION and BURSARY APPLICATIONS for IFTR 2018 are now OPEN! Please read below and follow the links for more details.
CFP – IFTR World Congress 2018

Theatre and Migration

Theatre, Nation and Identity: Between Migration and Stasis
9th July – 13th July 2018, Belgrade

We hereby invite you to submit your abstracts for the 2018 IFTR World Congress organized by the Studio-Laboratory for performing arts of the Faculty of Dramatic Arts in Belgrade, Serbia.
As a city with a complex and turbulent history and an important migratory route, with its constantly liminal position (East – West, EU – non-EU, old-fashioned – modern, intimate – metropolitan…), Belgrade will provide an opportunity to explore important issues of the contemporary world at the 2018 IFTR World Congress.
Please direct any questions you may have about the conference to iftr2018@fdu.bg.ac.rs
Abstract deadline: 15 January 2018.
You can submit your abstract to one of the following program sections:
– General Panels
– New Scholars’ Forum
– Working Groups
Abstract submission via Cambridge Core.
For more information on Cambridge Core and the abstract submission process see:
https://www.iftr.org/conference/abstract-submission
Bursary application deadline: Monday 11th December 2017
For information on the bursary application process see:
https://www.iftr.org/…/bursary-application-process-for-iftr…
CfP continued:
The term migration immediately invokes one of the central political, social, humanitarian and cultural issues of our time. It conjures images of people on cramped boats approaching the Italian island of Lampedusa and of people trying to jump on board lorries to cross the English Channel; images of dead bodies floating in the sea and of places left behind, turned to rubble; images of refugee camps from Dadaab in Kenya, the size of Minneapolis, to the infamous ‘Jungle’ in Calles. The notion of migration is intrinsically linked to questions of mobility and access as it evokes various performances of borders—for some they are porous, almost flexible, and for others they are impenetrable. The fences erected along the US and Mexican border and the India and Pakistani border, the checkpoints and walls separating Israel from the West Bank, the razor-barbed wire the Hungarian government installed on the border with Serbia to stop the influx of refugees: all map the most extreme aspects of migratory geographies, playing out over and over again the Derridian hospitality/hostility paradox.
The term migration is also closely linked to the construction of the Other, the figure of the foreigner in our everyday realities, in the media, and on stage. The uprooted person, the migrant figure, whether political, economic or spiritual, often triggers tensions between the familiar and the unknown, native and foreign, us and them. Within the current global political climate, marked by the increasing rise of the right and of xenophobic sentiments, the term migration prompts us to grapple with a variety of contradictions of hospitality and hostility, of solidarity and security, of activism and passivity, of movement and stasis.
Beyond its immediate, topical invocations, the term implies, more broadly, a body of persons or animals migrating together. These moving migrating bodies range from the political to the economic and to the spiritual; from refugees and asylum seekers to tourists, guest-workers, and visiting scholars; and even beyond human migration to include other kinds of migrating bodies—inspiring us, perhaps, to think of migration as a kind of a performative ecology that involves a wide variety of agents, processes and geographies.
Migration understood as an act—a form of being/doing—unfolds within different socio-political scenarios and through a repertoire of performative and affective gestures making possible for both individual and collective aspects to emerge. Dictionary definitions also describe the term ‘as movement from one part of something to the other’ — which includes both spatial and temporal dimensions, individuals, communities, animals, but also forms, ideas, aesthetics, and conventions. Thus, migration emerges as ultimately a relational category. In chemistry, it means a change or movement of atoms in a molecule. In physics, it means diffusion—the intermingling of substances by their natural movement. Applied to culture, these attributes of migration also suggest the spreading, mixing and remixing of forms and ideas. Hence, migration does not unfold in a straight line; it is rather a process of moving from one point to the other that necessitates meandering, wandering, changing of pace, transformation, negotiation, and adaptation.
We would like to approach the topic of Theatre and Migration from several broad angles, asking: How have theatre and performance responded to issues of exile, displacement and Otherness both historically and in our times? How has the process of migration been shaped and reshaped through various political, social, cultural and artistic scenarios? How can the notion of migration be employed to grapple with issues of cultural cross-fertilization, transfer, appropriation and mutation? What constitute ecologies of migration in theatre and performance (and beyond)?
Possible topics include but are not limited to:
Migration/ national identity/ national theatre
Performing borders
Access and mobility
Theatre history and historiography of migration
Migrating histories
The nascence and consequences of stasis
Creating and deconstructing stasis
Identity politics and the ‘humanism of the other’
Gender, race, ethnicity, and performances of belonging
Language and translation
Performing migratory geographies
Stasis as a counterpoint in a world of velocity and constant movement
Staging the paradox of hospitality
Theatres of migration, mobility, and citizenship
Performing stasis
Stasis as a possible solution to the postmodern state
Postmodern stasis as vacuum filled with or without meaning
Political theatre and migration
Performing community and displacement
Theatre of migrants/theatre for migrants
Ethics and agency of staging the Other
Open, closed and mobile spaces of performance
Migrating aesthetics
Theatre, migration & spectatorship
Migrating audiences
Migration, mutation, appropriation
Migration as the release of tensions
Performances of inclusion—migration and cultural policy
Migration, participation and delegated performance
Media, migration, theatre
Affect and efficacy
Theorizing migration and theatre
Ecologies of theatre and migration

For more follow the link – www.iftr.org/conference

CFP: In Motion: Performance & Unsettling Borders (Chicago, 27-29 Apr 18)

Northwestern University, Department of Performance Studies, Chicago, Illinois, April 27 – 29, 2018
Deadline: Dec 1, 2017

How do borders echo and reverberate as cultural geographies, unsettling space and forcing bodies to move, to organize, and to perform? How do performers and scholars account for and navigate their bordered existence, when traversing them can regularly (re)produce the conditions for both precarious and secure living? What conditions arise amongst bodies, boundaries, and the spaces there in between?

The 2018 Department of Performance Studies Graduate Student Conference, In Motion: Performance and Unsettling Borders, invites graduate students—practitioners and scholars—to generate dialogue and debate by coming together around artistic work and interdisciplinary thinking.

Recent international, national, and local political and social events have brought increased attention to the reality of borderlands as contentious sites of movement and activity. History demonstrates that borders—immaterial and material— have always existed and that movement has always been central in their negotiation. For some, borders are porous and easy to cross, a mere nuisance or pit stop. For others, borders are an integral part of being, continuously looming, shaping entire lives. If the border affirms its presence through constant yet imperfect iteration (repetition), then how might we employ performance (and practice) to interrogate its rigidity? How does performance elicit a mode of thinking and doing that allows us to consider how borders, contemporary and historical, demand both imaginary and tangible forces to be maintained—and how might we come to unsettle (or secure them) through our practice(s)?

We seek proposals for traditional academic papers, performance-lectures, live performances, and other experimental formats. Papers, performances, and experimental submissions might want to consider:

Decolonial practices and aesthetics
Affects and political economies of race, gender, sexuality and disability
Geopolitics, geographic (dis)location and positioning
Immigration, emigration, migration, and displacement
Choreographic patterns: kinesthetic awareness and somatic power
Sound, sound art, and acoustic resonance
Temporality: iteration, and repetition in/on the margins
Border-crossing: thresholds, vestibules, portals, gates, and throughways
Memory, embodiment, and transference
Language, translation, communication, speculation
Mediatisation, telecommunication, and other forms of network exchange
Interdisciplinarity, cross-disciplinary practices, syncretism, hybridity
Spatial politics: built-environments and architectures
Transnational flows: sovereignty, authority, and the state
Travel and tourism economics
Death, life, interstitial spaces
Skin, surface, hapticality
Object oriented ontologies

Locations are wheelchair accessible, but questions about accessibility and accommodations can be directed at Didier Morelli (didiermorelli2018@u.northwestern.edu). We have partnered with students in the Departments of Art Theory and Practice to realize this event. The three-day conference also includes a featured performance and discussion, lectures, catered meals/receptions, and a Long Table to build community and dialogue across disciplines and artistic practices. We acknowledge that Northwestern campus sits on unceded Native land, once occupied by the Council of Three Fires Nation which includes the Chippewa, Ottawa and Potawatomi.

The deadline for proposals is December 1, 2017.

Please submit all proposals, and any questions to, inmotion2018@gmail.com

For paper proposals, please submit as one word, pages or pdf document:
1) Name and Contact Information (with email address),
2) your institutional affiliation,
3) an abstract (~300 words),
4) a brief biography (~250 words), and
5) a curriculum vitae.

For performance and experimental proposals, please submit as one word, pages or pdf document:
1) Name and Contact Information (with email address),
3) your institutional affiliation,
2) description of performance (~300 words),
3) a brief biography (~250 words),
4) a resumé or curriculum vitae,
5) technical requirements and duration,
and, if applicable, and 6) up to six jpeg images, link to an online portfolio, or other relevant media.

Some partial travel grants will be available for participants. Notices of acceptance will be sent on January 15, 2018. There is no registration fee.

Reference / Quellennachweis:
CFP: In Motion: Performance & Unsettling Borders (Chicago, 27-29 Apr 18). In: ArtHist.net, Nov 15, 2017.

For more follow the link – https://arthist.net/archive/16741